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Mental Health

    Anxiety and Depression Can Add the Way to Treatment

    Aug 17, 2020

     

    What is depression?
    Depression is a mood disorder that is characterized by a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of

    interest. It is also known as a major depressive disorder. Depression affects how you feel, think,
    or behave [1].
     
    What causes Depression?

    The exact cause is unknown. It may be caused by a combination of factors like genetic, biological,
    environmental (trauma), and some psychological factors. Some conditions like cancer, pain, or
    any chronic condition increase the risk of getting depression.
    Generally, about 1 out of every 6 adults have depression [2]. Depression affects almost 16 million
    American adults every year [3]. Many people who have other mental disorders suffer from
    depression. 

    What is anxiety?
    Anxiety is an emotion characterized by a feeling of panic, worry, restlessness, and physical
    changes like increased blood pressure.
    There are several types of anxiety disorders like panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-
    compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Symptoms:
    Some symptoms like sleep disturbance, irritability, and difficulty concentration co-exist in both
    depression and anxiety. However, there are several key differences among them
    In depression; there are [4]
     Loss of interest and social isolation

     Anger and restlessness
     Lack of motivation, decreased energy, chronic fatigue
     Persistent feeling of sadness, worthlessness, and helplessness
     Suicide attempts
     Change in appetite 
     Difficulty sleeping

    In anxiety, symptoms include:
     Panic, apprehension, and restlessness
     Difficulty concentrating
     Racing heart
     Un satisfying sleep
     Dread
     Increased heart rate, sweating, and trembling
     Having difficulty controlling worry

    Can a person have both?
    Depression and anxiety occur at the same time [5]. Half of the people with either depression or
    anxiety can have the other condition [6]. 
    However, with a proper care plan, the condition can be improved
    .

      

    How to manage your symptoms

     Along with a well-devised treatment plan, these strategies will help you finding relief from

    symptoms

     Talk with someone you are comfortable with
     Accomplish the task you can manage like, making your bed
     Exercise, meditate and yoga
     Make a daily routine. It will help you

     Try to take a good sleep of seven to eight-hour

    Treatment of depression and anxiety

    Counseling:

    Counseling helps in fighting depression and anxiety [7, 8]. Different therapies help you according to your condition. For example,
     Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT): it helps you to adjust your thoughts, behaviors, and
    actions.
     Interpersonal therapy helps you to communicate better and also express yourself.
     Problem-solving therapy: will helps you in learning skills to manage your symptoms.

    Medication:
    There are drugs available that treat symptoms of both anxiety and depression at the same time.
    Anti-depressants are the major class used including SSRI (Selective Serotonin Reuptake
    Inhibitors). SSRI includes

     Citalopram
     Escitalopram
     Fluoxetine
     Sertraline
     
    Talk with your doctor about your symptoms thoroughly, so he can choose what is best for you.
    Also, keep in mind that your medicine takes a few weeks to work properly. 
    Anxiety and depression are both severe conditions. If not managed properly they can be
    worsened. A person having anxiety or depression is more likely to have another one. But with
    proper care and treatment, it can be managed.

    References:
    1. Moriarty, D.G., et al., The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Healthy
    Days Measures–Population tracking of perceived physical and mental health over
    time. 2003. 1(1): p. 37.
    2. Kessler, R.C., et al., Lifetime prevalence and age-of-onset distributions of DSM-IV
    disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. 2005. 62(6): p. 593-602.
    3. Abuse, S.J.R., MD: Substance Abuse and M.H.S. Administration, Mental Health
    Services Administration, Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and
    Health: Summary of National Findings, NSDUH Series H-41, HHS Publication
    No.(SMA) 11-4658. 2011. 201.
    4. Edition, F.J.A.P.A., Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 2013.
    5. Carek, P.J., S.E. Laibstain, and S.M.J.T.I.J.o.P.i.M. Carek, Exercise for the treatment
    of depression and anxiety. 2011. 41(1): p. 15-28.
    6. Hirschfeld, R.M.J.P.c.c.t.t.J.o.c.p., The comorbidity of major depression and anxiety
    disorders: recognition and management in primary care. 2001. 3(6): p. 244.
    7. Gelenberg, A.J., et al., Practice guideline for the treatment of patients with major
    depressive disorder third edition. 2010. 167(10): p. 1.
    8. Davidson, J.J.T.J.o.c.p., Major depressive disorder treatment guidelines in America and Europe. 2010. 71: p. e04.